AirToob Lightning

Tags  →  nordic-noir

Sofia Helin and Kim Bodnia on BBC Breakfast, talking about “The Bridge”


A couple of days ago we saw Sofia Helin and Kim Bodnia, stars of the mega-popular Scandi-hit The Bridge (finishing its second season here in the UK, with another season in production), appearing on BBC Breakfast. They are over here for London's Nordicana Festival, devoted to Nordic fiction and film.

It was particularly nice to meet the real Sofia, who has a charming and bubbly personality very different from that of Saga, the character she plays on television. Saga has an unspecified condition that might be Asperger's, a condition that makes her a brilliantly intuitive (and sometimes scary) detective who is almost totally deficient in inter-personal skills.

Kim is obviously a big fan of Sofia. “People ask me how I can work with someone without feelings - but when Sofia is acting, you see all of Saga's feelings in her eyes - so many feelings.”

Asked about any problems that came up between the Swedish and Danish languages, Sofia explained that the initial difficulties actually helped. “Being Saga is like being behind a glass wall. At the beginning it was very difficult... It demands a good one [Kim] to play against, otherwise I wouldn't have dared to do it.”

The Nordicana Festival, running in London at the beginning of February, is a remarkable illustration of how popular Nordic entertainment and literature has become over here (see my previous post, for instance).


If you're interested...

[More about The Bridge, and the “Scandinavian Invasion” generally, here on my web site]


(Original post: March 26th, 2011)


A time of great sorrow is upon us here in the UK - the imminent end of a truly superb crime series, probably the best of the wave of excellent "Nordic Noir" that we have been enjoying in the last few years, which in 20 one-hour episodes has been following 20 days in a complex and fascinating investigation.

I could explain why I think it's so good, but I can't improve on the reasons given here.


[For more excellent "Nordic Noir" in previous reviews, click the nordic-noir tag at the top of this post...]


I came across this wonderful book in a BBC programme called "Nordic Noir", which has become a general term to describe the English-speaking world's new-found appreciation for the superb crime writing and television productions coming to us from Scandinavia.

This particular book's plot is well described here. What is harder to convey is the brilliant quality of the writing, even in translation. I am reminded in a way of those wonderful movies like Doctor Zhivago, shot in 70mm and shown on a very large screen, with every scene full of many tiny crisp details. Nowadays we would describe those movies as being shot in "high definition", and Peter Hoeg's book is the literary equivalent - "high definition writing", if you like. He makes you feel and see every detail around you, and they are fascinating details woven into a highly gripping and unusual plot.

Highly recommended.

P.S.

My favourite online book store isn't Amazon, it's Abebooks.com (Abebooks.co.uk in the UK). This is the Advanced Book Exchange, a Canadian-based site that links you up with just about every second-hand bookshop on the planet. If you have never tried it, follow the links to see what you have been missing!




If you like this...

[Brian's Place - The Book corner]



The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

(Original post: August 17th, 2010)

I have rarely enjoyed a thriller so much as the Millennium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson, of which The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is the first part. Although it's a trilogy in books, in many ways it is a story in two parts, the second part being told in The Girl Who Played With Fire and The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest.

I like the books because they are complex, multi-layered and multi-threaded, weaving together an initial murder mystery, a conspiracy thriller, a biting commentary on aspects of Swedish society (and other societies), a range of fascinating personal relationships and a nail-biting suspense thriller around the emerging story of Lisbeth Salander - the girl with the dragon tattoo. I have read them several times - knowing the end doesn't spoil the books for me. The books contain strong sex and violence (sparsely distributed), but never gratuitously nor in any kind of titillating way.

I was hesitant about watching the Swedish movie of the first book, given the considerable challenges of bringing such a story to the screen, but I bought the DVD recently and was surprised at how very good it was. It offers both a Swedish soundtrack with English subtitles and an English soundtrack, and in only two and a half hours really conveys the essence of the book.

If you enjoyed the Swedish version of Wallander then you will really enjoy this DVD. The photography and atmosphere are very similar (and it's the same film studio doing both), but the plot of Stieg Larsson's books is much richer.

[Update April 2011] Unfortunately, the second and third Swedish movies were a disappointment to me. People who have not read the books may see nothing wrong with them, but the rich and satisfying nature of the original books has been almost entirely lost, especially in the final movie. Having seen the superb 20-hour Danish TV production of The Killing, I would really like the same treatment (whether Swedish or Danish - but not Hollywood) to be given to the Larsson novels. Michael Nyqvist I can take or leave alone, but improving on Noomi Rapace as the actress for Lisbeth will take some doing.



Noomi Rapace doing a fantastic job playing Lisbeth Salander


Noomi Rapace and Michael Nyqvist who plays the investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist


If you like this...

[My movies page]
[My books page]


(Original post: September 11th, 2009 - updated again July 28th 2014)

One of the best things I have seen on TV for a long time is the original Swedish version of Henning Mankell's Inspector Wallander, starring Krister Henriksson and Johanna Sallstrom (Johanna later died tragically), which has been running on BBC4. The BBC (for reasons best known to themselves) have suspended the series after 10 episodes, deciding to show the remaining 3 episodes of this series over the Christmas period (actually as of October 2009 they are starting again with the entire 13 episodes).

The cinematography, atmosphere, acting and stories have all been really first class. A good English language version of 3 episodes starring Kenneth Branagh introduced Wallander to many English viewers who (like me) had never heard of him, but the original Swedish version is even better.

Wallander has some of the melancholy of Inspector Morse (Kenneth Branagh was dubbed "Inspector Norse"), but he is not the "prima donna" of John Thaw's classic interpretation of Morse. Krister Henriksson plays Wallander as a serious cop, well able to work with colleagues (including his screen daughter Linda) who are real people with real problems. The sometimes tedious conventions of English and American TV detective shows are refreshingly missing in Wallander. The events in the stories are often quite brutal, but are counterbalanced by the natural beauty of the area, the realistic and absorbing personal relationships, and the quietness of the professional police operations.

The Inspector Wallander web site, intended for English-speaking fans, is an excellent source of information on the series. Among other things you can find out about the second Swedish series, and get advice on a logical reading order for the translated books.

I am actually not a great fan of the books, especially the early ones. Kenneth Branagh's version of Wallander is drawn from these books, whereas the Krister Hendriksson version is based on specially-written stories for the series, when Wallander is much older and more experienced.

The second series of Wallander starring Krister Henriksson is, unusually for a sequel, every bit as good as the first. Wallander's daughter is no longer with him (for reasons not dwelt on), but a new recruit, played excellently by Nina Zanjani, provides a new non-sexual relationship with Wallander which is part of the enormous appeal of this series.

The third (and definitely final) series is not quite as enjoyable as the second, due to Wallander's character succumbing slowly to Alzheimer's as his career draws to its inevitable end, but is of unmissable quality. His daughter Linda returns, this time married and played most capably by Charlotta Jonsson. Krister Hendriksson's acting, however, is in a class of its own.

In 2014, Britain is totally hooked on the superb standard of Nordic Noir and Borgen. Krister Hendriksson's Wallander was where it all began.

If you like this...

[My Movies/TV page]