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Margarita Kareva from the Russian city of Ekaterinburg is a wedding photographer making magical photos of women. [Margarita] is all grown up, but fairytales still inspire her everyday job as a fantasy photographer...”

A photographer whose other work is well worth exploring, found on the beautiful and interesting pages of Ladygray.




... and I can't resist heavy horses either - a very nice Budweiser ad from this year's Super Bowl




Hockley Valley


“Morning on the Farm”


“Jenne Farm”

Beautiful images of autumn (or fall) in Canada, © by Magda Bognar


From the page Fall or autumn: the Canadian dilemma:


If you like this...

[Autumn and winter images by Anka Zhuravleva]



"Girlfriends" by Natalia Kolyadyuk (a wildlife and nature photographer whose other work is well worth checking out)






Wonderful photography © by the Russian photographer and artist Anka Zhuravleva

I found Anka here on the beautiful pages of SansMots.

"Passing by" by E. Martin Hennings

I came across this beautiful painting (which cannot be reproduced here) long ago on a poster from Art in New Mexico, 1900-45: Paths to Taos and Santa Fe, an exhibition at the National Museum of American Art way back in 1986 (and still a book of the same name).

"The sun" by `greenfeed, who also does some excellent fantasy art and photomanipulation work



An untitled picture (on this page, anyway) by the Russian photographer Mihail Kopychko

Thanks to Aline and Norseye for this one (I'm posting the non-Pixdaus version here)


"Three Whites" by Hans Kawitzki, whose other work is well worth looking at

I can almost hear my younger daughter muttering "Three Greys" in my ear, but I'm no horse expert and it's a beautiful picture!




Some very fine work with a graphite pencil by Linda Huber

Thanks for introducing me to this artist, Aline!


(Original post: February 13th, 2009)

Norman Thelwell, who died in February 2004, was one of Britain's finest cartoonists. If you were a girl who loved ponies, or the parent (like me) or relative of such a girl, then you would have known every one of his books of pony cartoons intimately!

Thelwell's cartoons and landscape paintings went far beyond ponies though. He was known as the "unofficial artist of the British countryside", and with good reason. His cartoons and his paintings revealed a deep knowledge of, and affection for, the things that he loved best.


A long time ago I walked into a small second-hand bookshop in deepest Sussex, looking for one of Thelwell's cartoon books which (unbelievably) were all out of print. The owner (and complete staff) of the bookshop regretted that he didn't have one, but explained that he, and many such bookshops all over the world, did a lot of trade through a Canadian-based online organization called the Advanced Book Exchange.

When I got home I investigated this amazing site and found well over a thousand of Thelwell's books in shops all over the world. I felt like I had wandered into Terry Pratchett's L-Space, in which all libraries are connected!

Among these books I discovered a wonderful autobiography by Thelwell, "A Plank Bridge By A Pool".

A description of this book reads: "A portrait in words and pictures of a garden in rural England that has become a wild life sanctuary. It is also the story of how one man realized a boyhood dream. Norman Thelwell, whose riding cartoons are published worldwide, describes in words and pictures how he landscaped his cottage garden and attracted wildlife of all kinds."

I don't know if this painting belongs to the places described in the book, but it well might.




A wonderful picture by Judy Larson.

From her web page:

"Her unique approach to her work is through the use of scratch board--a technique that can render magnificent detail but one requiring infinite patience.

"Scratch board, an old, but little used medium, consists of a smooth, thin surface of hardened China clay applied to a board. The subject is then painted solidly with black India ink to create a silhouette.

"Now the exacting work begins, engraving the image into the surface of the artwork. While many artists use steel nibs or engraving tools, Judy prefers to work with X-acto blades, changing them ever few minutes to produce as fine a line as possible. Once the subject has been totally scratched, it is a finished black and white illustration, ready for the artist to add color. The methods of adding color are diverse. Judy prefers a combination of airbrush, gouache or acrylics for finishing, with frequent rescratching for detail."


There is more to Judy's pictures (including the one above) than first meets the eye: if you missed it, check out her Image Key (mouse-over the images)!


This is another great find from the pages of my friend skip2mylou (one of the most under-rated stumblers on SU). Thanks again!