AirToob Lightning

Tags  →  geology


I have read a lot of science fiction and fantasy books in my time, and this trilogy is top-of-the-range in either category.

It is unique in many ways, but most of them I can't tell you about without seriously spoiling the plot.

I can say that it's the only work I have read in which the “science” part is geology, and that the style of story-telling includes passages addressed to “you”, putting you in the story as one of the characters - but which one, and who is telling you the story, is something you don't find out until the end.

The whole trilogy, in fact, is a gripping and apparently endless series of reveals.

The excellent review (click the image above to read) contains spoilers, so please don't read too far if you read it at all.

I will risk one extract from the review:

What also makes this work unique is the author herself, the first black winner of SF and Fantasy's prestigious Hugo Award (which was given to each of the novels in this trilogy as it appeared).

If you click the image below, which comes from a different excellent review in The Guardian, you will learn more about the author and also about the trilogy (relatively spoiler-free).
N.K. Jemisin


If you like this...

[More SF and fantasy books from my Books Page]


A very nice image of some of The 12 Apostles in the Port Campbell National Park, by the Australian nature photographer and book author Steve Parish - click the image for his interesting information about the place


Trees on Mars?

A HiRISE image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter showing trees on Mars... or so it appears!
Click the image for full-size version

(Image from this page - check out the "subimage")

Explanation from the page:

There is a vast region of sand dunes at high northern latitudes on Mars. In the winter, a layer of carbon dioxide ice covers the dunes, and in the spring as the sun warms the ice it evaporates. This is a very active process, and sand dislodged from the crests of the dunes cascades down, forming dark streaks.

Another discovery on the fine pages of batchbatcharak.

If you like this...

[More about HiRISE (High-resolution Image Science Experiment)]
[More examples of carbon dioxide fans from HiRISE]
[Polar Geology on Mars (science theme from the HiRISE site)]
[Awesome desktop wallpaper images from HiRISE]



A shot of one of the many thermal pools in Yellowstone National Park © by Danielle Goldstein (available as desktop wallpaper)