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Tags  →  animation



Of all the works by the legendary Hayao Miyazaki, My Neighbour Totoro is undoubtedly the most loved. Children who grew up with it remember it as one of their favourite movies, and many love it even more as adults.

I never saw it as a child (I was a grown-up in 1988), but it is certainly now one of my all-time favourite movies. It's a gentle story of childhood joys and fears that celebrates kindness, a close relationship with Nature and (as one expects from Miyazaki) the Japanese tradition of respect for one's elders.

I recently had the pleasure of introducing it to my 7-year old granddaughter (not that I need an excuse to watch it), and was struck by what a wonderful antidote it is to the poisonous spirit emanating from the current US President.

I also recently discovered a marvellous retrospective of this great movie. I recommend clicking either image above to read it (the second image is actually my own screenshot). If you do, don't miss its link to an all-but-forgotten classic Disney animation called The Old Mill.

If you like this...

[The Art of Animation: Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli]




One of the last remaining trees...
(My screenshots - click either image above for the Wikipedia article on this movie)


(Screenshots above from Rotten Tomatoes - click either image to see more)

If you like French animation (see here on my web site), you may remember the time when Sylvain Chomet's Les Triplettes de Belleville (The Triplets of Belleville, a.k.a. Belleville Rendezvous) gave the world a wake-up call that there was more to great animation than Disney and Miyazaki.

This movie is very different and equally original (and equally Gallic, and equally unsuitable for small children). It's an adventurous eco-fable, set in an alt-reality steampunk world where almost all of the trees in Europe have been burnt for charcoal and the air is severely polluted. It has been summarized accurately as “a sophisticated, riveting adventure about the power of scientific innovation in society”.

Currently free to watch in the UK if you subscribe to Amazon Prime Video, this is a multi-award-winning treat not to be missed.


If life is getting you down...

[Try clicking the entertainment tag. Just a suggestion!]



A beautiful animated tribute to Cecil, speedpainted by Aaron Blaise

Click the text below for a lot more...


Thanks to my younger daughter for this one!


The Art of Animation: Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli

I am a long time fan of Studio Ghibli, and I still consider Hayao Miyazaki's Spirited Away to be the finest animation ever made (a close runner-up being The Illusionist by Sylvain Chomet).

One reason that I am a fan is the beautiful environments (often urban) created in many of their films. These are works of art in their own right, and I have done my best to capture (with my own screenshots) some of the ones that I particularly like.

In order to keep this post a reasonable length, and because the art in many of the films can only be appreciated in animated form, I have chosen only three films (omitting, for example, the beautiful natural environment of My Neighbour Totoro along with many others). Click any image if you would like to see links about that film.


Kiki's Delivery Service

This charming story about the early difficulties of a trainee witch, based on a children's fantasy novel, would be worth watching just for the artwork of the beautiful Scandinavian-style landscape and city. When the weather is lousy or everything seems miserable, I watch this film again, thinking how much I would like to live here - and how much designers of modern architecture could learn from the film.

Kiki standing outside the bakery, overlooking the sea. Behind her is a glimpse of the lower part of the fictional city. The (apparently hand-painted) details of mortar, stones, plaster, tiles and so much else is incredible - the more you look, the more you see. As with so many of Miyazaki's urban environments, it is set on a hill, giving it added interest as a place and a wonderful three-dimensional feel as art.

The fictional city is “Koriko” or “Coriko”, although the characters don't mention it. Miyazaki's inspiration for it was the town of Visby on the island of Gotland, Sweden (worth looking at), although the fictional Koriko is a much larger place.

This is animation at its finest (no still images can convey how good it is), and one of my all-time favourite movies. (The version I have is in Japanese, with English subtitles, which I generally prefer.)


The bakery, with another glimpse of Koriko rising above it, lit (as often in Miyazaki's films) by a low sun. The room at the top of the stairs is a kind of storage loft, which Kiki can use free as her room (and have free use of the telephone for her delivery business) in exchange for helping out at the bakery.


The view from Kiki's room, as evening falls.


The bakery at night.

The Wind Rises

This is to be the last of Miyazaki's films (see here), and in many ways is very different from the others. A very good description of it can be found here.

It is a fictionalized version of the life of Jiro Horikoshi, designer of the Mitsubishi fighters that flew in WWII. It features many things: the love and mystique of aviation (and a repugnance for its use in war) that is Miyazaki's own, a stunning sequence covering the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923, 7.9 on the Richter scale, that devastated Tokyo and the surrounding area, and a bittersweet story concerning his love for Nahoko, a girl whom he rescues during the earthquake and then doesn't see again for some time.

The story is fascinating from a historical point of view, but it also features some fine art work that somehow makes even factories and aircraft hangars things of beauty. I have selected just a few here.

A train journey during a period of tranquillity. Jiro is on his way to a hotel where he will again encounter Nahoko. Trains, and other means of transport, feature in many of Miyazaki's films with an extraordinary attention to realistic detail. (In Kiki's Delivery Service, when looking through the front window of an old-fashioned bus about to depart, we can see its nose rise as it is lifted by the torque of the engine, before setting off - a detail most people wouldn't even care about, or notice.)


The outfall from a beautiful spring pool, near the hotel where he encounters Nahoko.


Walking back to the hotel, caught in a sudden rain squall. Wind, rain and clouds are often major features of Miyazaki's films.


The hotel where Nahoko and Jiro meet.


Nahoko sadly dies of tuberculosis. They marry so that they can live together for the short time left, but Nahoko disappears one day, returning to the sanatorium so that he will remember her as she was. Together with other patients, she lies (well bundled up) on the verandah of the sanatorium, and in this beautiful short sequence she looks up at the sky as snow falls.

Whisper of the Heart

This is another great favourite of mine. It's a coming-of-age story set in modern Tokyo. Its heroine Shizuku is led on a journey that becomes more and more magical at it progresses - not, in this case, the magic of myths or legends, but a way of seeing the real world through the eyes of a young teenager that becomes a true voyage of enchantment.

The film was written by Miyazaki but directed by Yoshifumi Kondo, whom Miyazaki hoped would take over from him. Kondo's premature death shortly afterwards, apparently caused by overwork, seems to have led Miyazaki to announce his retirement, although (fortunately for us) he continued to work for a further 15 years but at a more relaxed pace.


The apartment block where Shizuku lives is far from luxurious...


The door is metal and the interior is very small and cluttered. Nevertheless Shizuku's family lives happily there, and apart from the expected occasional friction with Shizuku's older sister, is very supportive of her.

Shizuku's life is one of an ordinary young teenager. She attends a local school, remarkable only for the respect that Miyazaki always shows being given by children to their elders and teachers. Shizuku writes two translated versions of John Denver's “Take Me Home, Country Roads” (hilarious when translated back to English in subtitles) - she doesn't really understand the concept of a “home town”, and her second version is entitled “Take Me Home, Concrete Roads”.

Shizuku is a voracious reader, borrowing books from the library, and keeps encountering the name of a previous borrower, Seiji Amasawa. She encounters Seiji several times without realizing who he is, and is extremely cross when he teases her. But things will change...


One day when Shizuku travels on the local train, she is joined by an unusually independent cat. When they get off together she follows him...


...losing him...


...but discovering him again higher up the hill.


The cat leads her up a steep, narrow rubbish-strewn alley.


(Monitor test: you should be able to see considerable detail even on plain concrete walls.)


Shizuku emerges into what, to her, is a different world...


...and discovers an open, and apparently deserted, antique shop...


...in which she will discover Seiji's grandfather, and learn that Seiji himself lives downstairs, learning to be a violin maker.

Here she also meets The Baron, an amazing statuette with crystal eyes, whose story links to an unfulfilled love in the grandfather's past life.


Seiji's grandfather shows her a marvellous clock that he is repairing, whose mechanisms include another depiction of unfulfilled love.



Shizuku later meets Seiji here, and learns that he hopes to leave schooling early for a career making violins - but first he will have to prove himself by becoming an apprentice to a strict violin-making master in Cremona, Italy.


Shizuku realises how much she will miss him, and decides to challenge herself while he is away by writing a long story, which she calls Whisper of the Heart, inspired by the story of The Baron.


Seiji's grandfather wants to be the first to read her story, and Shizuku waits for hours on his lower verandah while he does so, in an agony of suspense. He finally appears and tells her that her story is a little rough, like any craftsman's first work, but she has dug out some real gems from her heart - and makes the hugely relieved Shizuku a supper of Ramen noodles.


Early one cold morning Seiji returns, and calls to Shizuku to come down.


He takes her high up to one of his favourite places...


...to watch a magical sunrise above Tokyo




If you like this...

[Wingsee, a delightful site dedicated to the work of Studio Ghibli and Hayao Miyazaki]
[The painting "Ship Flying Over The Rainbow" from "Kiki's Delivery Service"]
[Joe Hisaishi plays his piano music from "Spirited Away"]
[The Art of Animation: Disney's “Tangled”]



A fine work of animation, featured in one of many, many fine posts by Retrit, one of the best bloggers to move from SU to Categorian. Enjoy her post, but don't miss all the other great stuff on her pages!


The Art of Animation: Disney's “Tangled”

Alan Jones, writing in the UK's historically-named Radio Times (now our leading TV and Radio magazine):

“This deft vrsion of a Brothers Grimm fairy tale find Rapunzel (voiced by Mandy Moore) trapped in a tower by Mother Gothel (Donna Murphy), who uses the princes's long magical hair to stay forever young. Flynn Rider (Zachary Levi) is the handsome, cocksure thief who provides the kidnapped royal with a possible escape route. It's a smart, snappy and sparkling tale, which uses Rapuzel's multitasking flowing tresses to great effect.”

Frozen is (to date) the most successful animation feature ever made, and I really enjoyed it. However Tangled is still my favourite production from Walt Disney Animation Studios, thanks in no small part to Glen Keane, Disney's master character animator, who subsequently left Disney (more on that here if you're interested).


Pascal and Rapunzel (click the image for many more)


Click this image for the full-size HD wallpaper, which also shows several of the new animation features used in the production


Flynn, beginning a long process of personality improvement...


Maximus, a horse with serious attitude, and a real masterpiece of character animation... definitely worth clicking on this one...


A particularly beautiful animation sequence (click the image for many more)

It seems that Tangled was produced at a critical time for Walt Disney Animation Studios. Recent productions had not been a success, and they were losing out to studios like Pixar Animation Studios and Dreamworks Animation. The turning point for Disney animation was Glen Keane's seminar to his colleagues, many of them wedded to old-style animation, reported here in The New York Times.

From Wikipedia's article on Tangled (worth reading):

Technical and artistic brilliance wouldn't have been enough in themselves to make Tangled as successful as it was. As Alan Jones wrote, it's a “smart, snappy and sparkling tale”, with a strong story line and many really hilarious moments. Many people were involved with that, but without Glen Keane it would have been a different tale altogether.

If you like this...

[Watch “Duet”, a wonderful animation short by Glen Keane]
[Superb animation that was NOT done by motion capture: the Tiger in “Life of Pi”]





I had never registered Glen Keane's name until I saw this wonderful short animation. Now I keep noticing it, most recently when I finally got around to seeing his work on Tangled, which I liked as much as I liked Frozen. Glen apparently quit Frozen to work on Tangled - the text of his resignation letter is here.

Glen was also responsible for the character animation in one of my other favourite Disney films, Beauty and the Beast, which took the quality of Disney animations to a whole new level.

If you like animation, I recommend...

[More about Glen Keane]


From the page:


If you're a Miyazaki fan, click the image below to see all the artist's work full size (and see how many details you recognize)... and please visit batchbatcharak, from whose fine pages this comes!



If you like this...

[Japanese animation at its finest: the master-works of Hayao Miyazaki]
[The painting "Ship Flying Over The Rainbow" from "Kiki's Delivery Service"]
[Joe Hisaishi plays his piano music from "Spirited Away"]

and maybe also...

[Beautiful stained glass by Rober Oddy]



*Broken link fixed!*

Last year at Christmas the UK's John Lewis department store chain produced a truly charming advertisement called The Journey (well worth watching at this time of year if you have never seen it)

This year they have produced another, The Bear and the Hare. Enjoy!




This is a wonderful, surreal animation by Cordell Barker, presented by the National Film Board of Canada. The spiky social-commentary humour reminds me a little of Sylvain Chomet's "Belleville Rendezvous" (Les Triplettes de Belleville) (I describe some of Sylvain's work here on my Movies web page, if you are interested).

I owe this gem, as so many others, to one of Gatorindo (David)'s many great shares - this one, in fact. Well worth reading!


*Broken link fixed!*


A wonderful surreal film by Nicolas Devaux, whose other work is well worth checking out, e.g. here

(My personal prize for the most cretinous comment seen so far this year on YouTube, an award for which there is fierce competition, goes to the person who saw a few minutes of this film and triumphantly announced that it was "a fake".)

Thanks to romancinme and ensemble5 for this one!








A truly beautiful video, blending science, nature and spirituality, from Cristóbal Vila
(click any screenshot to play, opens in a separate window)


Thanks, Elegantlady (Roberta)!


If you like this...

["Nature by Numbers", another beautiful video by Cristóbal Vila]



Once in a while, we are lucky enough to get a movie that provides an experience like no other. Last year, for me, that was Hugo. This year it was Life of Pi, directed by Ang Lee.

Apart from being a great story of spirituality and adventure, the movie contains what must be among the most beautiful images ever seen in the cinema, and some of the most awe-inspiring visions of the ocean in all its moods and variety. Like Hugo, it can't be fully appreciated except on the big screen, and like Hugo it really needs 3D.

Not to be missed!

BTW...

If you're interested in the technology of film making, Scot Byrd of Rhythm & Hues Studios corrected an article in Time Magazine as follows:

Just to be clear, motion capture was not used in "Life of Pi." Key frame animation was the technique employed by the digital artists at Rhythm & Hues, the visual effects company responsible for production of the computer-generated animals in "Life of Pi." (R&H also created the photorealistic skies and oceans during the open ocean scenes. London's Moving Picture Company - MPC - was responsible for the shipwreck sequence.)

Motion capture technique uses sensors to capture a single performance, usually performed by a human being. (Imagine putting motion sensors on a living tiger!) Key frame animation works like puppetry inside the computer. The animator sets a pose, which the computer remembers as a key frame. The performance is created as the artist sets a multitude of key frames/poses and the computer moves the character rig from pose to pose to pose.

The origins of key frame animation go back to traditional 2D cell animation, as seen in any Disney animated feature going all the way back to Steamboat Willie, followed by most Saturday morning cartoon shows and the modern animated incarnations up to and including those produced by Pixar, Dreamworks Animation, BlueSky, et al.

For Rhythm & Hues, the actual line of ascension runs from the Coca Cola Polar Bears to "Babe", "Cats & Dogs", "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe", "The Golden Compass", "Alvin and the Chipmunks" to "Life of Pi."

While it may seem an academic distinction, in the world of animation, the key frame technique has a long tradition, and the artists who have spent a lifetime developing their craft deserve their recognition. The added challenge and critically acclaimed success of melding photorealistic, computer-generated characters with photorealistic computer-generated environments demonstrates just how groundbreaking the technology and artistry of "Life of Pi" is.



If you like this...

[My movies page]




Having seen the trailers for Brave, I wasn't sure how much I would like this latest movie from Pixar - but I did, enormously. The extraordinarily detailed CGI world in which it is set (much more impressive than appears here), the Celtic atmosphere and the slightly unusual story made this a winner for me.

Highly recommended (and definitely worth seeing on the big screen, in 3D if possible).



Channel 5 recently screened a restored version of Disney's animated version of "Robin Hood". It was a very long time since I had last seen it, and I had forgotten what an entertaining movie it is (in spite of importing lots of Americana into Sherwood Forest and recycling so much from Disney's "The Jungle Book"!). It's actually one of my Disney favourites.

It features some nice songs, and artwork like this. It happened that I paused the movie on this frame when my spouse returned with a friend from an afternoon's shopping. When the friend noticed it she thought it was a nice screensaver. Guessing what movie it came from would be quite tricky, I think!




"Follow me", a beautiful song by Kimiko Itoh, set to the music of Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez

From the soundtrack of the anime/computer animated science fiction film Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence

One of many beautiful things to be found on the pages of ensemble5 (forwarded to me by Elegantlady (Roberta)).




"After organizing our bookshelf almost a year ago, my wife and I (Sean Ohlenkamp) decided to take it to the next level. We spent many sleepless nights moving, stacking, and animating books at Type bookstore in Toronto (883 Queen Street West, (416) 366-8973)."

Great fun - thanks, Purplegem!


This is the coolest and funniest Christmas video that I have ever seen. However blue you are feeling, this will cheer you up!

I have posted this in previous years but (as usual) I can't resist doing it again.

The music, by the way, is sung by Clyde McPhatter (Santa) and The Drifters (reindeer). The animation is by Joshua Held.

Merry Christmas to everyone!







I watched Ratatouille again recently, and was reminded of what a great (and hugely enjoyable) work of art this is - it's my personal favourite of all Pixar's productions so far.

Click the picture if you would like further ramblings on this subject!



Full Oscar-nominated 6-minute short film of 'Granny O'Grimm', directed by Nicky Phelan, produced by Brown Bag Films, and written/voiced by Kathleen O'Rourke (more on the film and its makers here)

A great share by my friend MadMadamMim (Dunja), a visit to whose pages is highly recommended.


Evolution of the gas density in the high resolution resimulation of clustor 001
(Watch the movie here, and more simulation movies here)

The Bolshoi simulation (says the page) is the most accurate cosmological simulation of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe yet made (“bolshoi” is the Russian word for “great” or “grand”).

Thanks to Samaryantha for this one.



"Like Summer", a particularly fine example of animation art by the Portuguese CG artist and video game creator Luis Melo


(Original post: May 18th, 2011)



These are some scenes from the wonderful animation The Illusionist by Sylvain Chomet, featured on my Movies page, which has just had a second major update. Since the previous update on April 11th it has approximately doubled in size, with many more sections and updates to existing sections.

If you like movies (and the flavour of my pages here), and/or you are interested in the technology of movie-making, then I hope that you will find it an interesting and useful resource.







From the page:

In "Nature by Numbers," filmmaker Cristóbal Vila presents a series of animations illustrating various mathematic principles, beginning with a breathtaking animation of the Fibonacci sequence. Then it moves on to the Golden and Angle Ratios, the Delaunay Triangulation and Voronoi Tessellations. This would be math-class gold, and it's awfully sweet even if math class is years behind you.

If you are fascinated by this brilliant animation (which I found on Ian's pages), here is a quick guide to finding out more (should you need or want it):

The Fibonacci Sequence is formed by starting with 0,1 and adding the two numbers together to get a new number (giving 0,1,1). If you keep doing this using the last 2 numbers in the sequence then you get 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21... Fibonacci thought up this sequence (in the year 1202) as described in Fibonacci's Rabbits, which is well worth reading, as is all the other information that you will find there.

Two numbers "a" and "b" are said to be in the Golden Ratio if the ratio of "a" to "b" is the same as the ratio of "a+b" to "a". You can't write this ratio exactly as a decimal number, but it is approximately 1.618.

The Golden Ratio, referred to as phi (greek letter), is approximated ever more closely by the ratio of any two successive numbers in the Fibonacci Sequence, as the sequence is taken further and further. From the sequence above you can see that 13/8 is an approximation of the ratio, but 21/13 is a better approximation (and so it goes on).

Spookily, you can start a sequence with any two numbers, e.g. (235,1) and extend it using the same rules as for the Fibonacci Sequence, and the ratio between the last two numbers will still get closer and closer to the Golden Ratio as the sequence extends. In other words, it is the rules, rather than the starting numbers, that matter.

The Golden Section is a line segment divided according to the Golden Ratio.

The Golden Angle is what you get if you divide a circle's circumference according to the Golden Section, draw two lines from the centre of the circle to where the circumference is split, and take the smaller angle between those two lines. It is about 137.5 degrees. You will see it appearing in the animation.

I can't tell you much about Delaunay Triangulations and Voronoi Tessellations (not having met them before), except that they are reflected in the way in which Nature packs things together. This amazing video has certainly inspired me to try to find out more.


If you like this...

[A great post on the Fibonacci series from laydgray]
[... and you might like the mind-stretchers tag at the top of this post]


If the rules of Desert Island Discs were changed to allow a DVD player and just one DVD to take to the island, then in my case that one DVD might be "Kiki's Delivery Service", by the Japanese master of animation Hayao Miyazaki.

If you have seen it then you may remember the beautiful painting that Kiki's friend Ursula is working on in her cabin in the woods. The painting, called "Ship Flying Over the Rainbow", was actually the work of students of Hachinohe City Minato Junior High School Handicapped Children's Class, and what you see in the animation is a still photo of the painting by Junichi Ochiai.

I haven't been able to find a copy of this painting online, so I took these screenshots from my copy of the DVD:






One reason that I like "Kiki" so much is the beautiful landscape and town that Miyazaki (a person with great respect for the environment) conjures up. I would love to live in that bakery by the sea.

I have always wondered what blend of real places contributed to Miyazaki's vision, and recently discovered the answer here (along with many other interesting facts about the movie).


If you like this...


[Joe Hisaishi plays his piano music from "Spirited Away"]
[Japanese animation at its finest: the master-works of Hayao Miyazaki]


One of my favourite tags...

[childhood]



Joe Hisaishi, playing his own composition, the theme "One Summer Day" from one of my all-time favourite movies, the Oscar-winning Spirited Away

Joe Hisaishi is a really interesting and talented composer as well as musician. He composed the music for many of Hayao Miyazaki's movies, making a major contribution to their special magic. His stage name (reversed so his family name comes first) was adopted by him as a phonetic equivalent of the name of one of his own favourite composers, Quincy Jones.



If you like this...

[Japanese animation at its finest: the master-works of Hayao Miyazaki]
[My movies page]


"Dream"

A delightful short animation by gvozdariki, very soothing, sent to me by my friend mikimile - thanks, Miki!

Click the image to play - opens in a separate window.


With WALL-E, Pixar Animation Studios excelled themselves in several ways.

The creation of the desolate earth environment, and the space-going cruise ship, are incredible artistic achievements (as well as superb technical achievements) in their own right. I can imagine some people being put off going to see the movie because its first part is set in a planet-sized garbage tip, and who would want to see that? In fact, the earth environment is a work of strange, desolate beauty, lit by a coppery light and given wonderful aerial perspective by the haze in the polluted air. This picture (one of several concept background paintings for WALL-E at the Pixar - 20 Years of Animation exhibit in Finland) gives some idea, but the environment realised in the movie is so imaginative, so detailed and so highly textured that you really have to see it on the big screen. I shall certainly buy the DVD but it won't be the same!

The visual environment is only part of it, of course. The inventiveness of the story is quite exceptional, and it has some of the magic and pathos of the silent movies of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. When WALL-E plays his treasured tapes of old musicals, the contrast of Earth's past with the current desolation is highlighted, but the musicals also provide an uplifting background to the unlikely romance between the two main characters, which is conducted entirely without normal speech.

The movie also has a serious side, very unusual in popular animated films. The space-going vessel (awesomely realised) is a combination of mega Caribbean cruise ship and aseptic Disney theme park. It is a pristine, gleaming vision of hell in which nothing has changed for 700 years, except that the passengers have become helpless and obese, doing nothing and creating nothing for themselves, seeing the world only through computer screens and having their every need attended to by an army of robots. Don't worry though, WALL-E is about to change all that... and the movie becomes (in addition to everything else) a really exciting adventure story.

In spite of the sombreness of the underlying themes, this is a joyous movie that sparkles throughout (and which has numerous Easter-egg references to other great movies). My favourite scene is probably the one where WALL-E and EVE are outside the space-ship, performing a kind of aerial (or vacuum) ballet as WALL-E uses a fire extinguisher to try to get back on board, which turns into a weightless dance worthy of "Singing in the rain".

It's magical stuff.


[Other WALL-E links]
[Pixar's previous masterpiece: "Ratatouille"]
[Japanese animation at its finest: the master-works of Hayao Miyazaki]
[My movies page]




For me, Ratatouille was the most enjoyable movie of 2007. Apart from the appealing story and the staggeringly good animation, there was the wry experience of being educated in the enjoyment of good food by a rat!

Like many people, I suspect, I now take great animation like this for granted. I have to keep reminding myself that thinking about the artistry in this movie (or in any good animated or special-effects movie) as "computer generated" is like crediting the artistry of Rembrandt to the hog bristles in his brushes and to the pigments in his paint!

This article gives some idea of what was actually involved in making Ratatouille. It really is a case of art concealing art (I knew the expression but never looked up its origin, hence the link!). Pixar Animation Studios can be justifiably proud of this one.

(I am glad to see that the DVD also has a copy of the hilarious Pixar short Lifted, which was shown with Ratatouille in our local cinema.)






[Japanese animation at its finest: the master-works of Hayao Miyazaki]
[My movies page]