AirToob Lightning

It has been known for some time that hurricanes need warm-enough surface temperatures in the oceans in order to form. The critical temperature turns out to be 26.5°C or 79.7°F.

Climate change is increasing sea temperatures, and even a few degrees matters.

In 2017 the exceptionally high surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico that launched Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria were measured at 32°C or 89.6°F.

There have been many suggestions for cooling surface temperatures enough to prevent hurricanes from forming, but they have all seemed impractical.

Until now.

The Norwegians have long stopped ice forming in their fjords by efficient “bubble curtains” - bubbles of compressed air blown from perforated pipes, bringing relatively warm water from depths to the surface. Their scientists have pointed out that the system could be used for the opposite effect, bringing cooler water from (ideally) 100 meters to 150 meters below the surface to reduce the surface temperatures.

The first site for a real test may be the Yucatán Straits, which connect the Caribbean Sea to the Gulf of Mexico.

Reversing climate change, if it can happen at all, is a long term prospect.

When set against the enormous costs of destructive hurricanes, this idea for an interim solution may prove to be both practical and cost-effective. If you're interested in the idea and its progress, you will find many reports on it if you click the image above.